Nothing Lost in Translation: Our First Blog Post

Nothing Lost in Translation: Our First Blog Post

Allied keeps your word.  Nothing is lost in translation.

This is my first blog for Allied Interpreting and Translating services. So, you readers out there need to be patient with me.  I am told that I can write. In college, I took four semesters of writing and two in advanced writing. The word blog did not exist in those days. (Ooopppss, just gave away my age, or thereabouts). Actually, in those days, I couldn't even type, so it was pen to paper. I still have some of my early writings.  I call these masterpieces of prose, "my embryonic period.''

However, as I am being taught, there is a difference between ''writing'' and ''blogging''. I 'won't bore you with the differences, but you can read the stuff yourself, by 'Googling' what is the difference between writing and blogging''. To me, it is quite confusing and 'didn't help me one way or the other. 'SRO's, length, personal, stinted language, casual language...who knows?

My goal is to have readers find me, read the blog, like it, check out our website, and call us for your interpreting and translation needs and go viral.  A little background on Allied may help.

Our Company History

 A bit about Allied: my wife, Silvia, started the business over 39 years ago. She was then a certified Spanish interpreter and had been practicing her trade for many a year.  (She still speaks with an Argentinian accent.) She determined that there was a business to be had by hiring interpreters and translators who knew many languages and offering this service to the legal and business communities of California. 

For all these 39 years, Allied has been, the “go-to” source, for finding professional and certified interpreters and translators. From any language to any language, Allied is known for 'keeping your word, while losing nothing in translation.’ Allied serves the needs of the legal and business communities, court reporting services, in Los Angeles and around the globe. 

Allied Interpreting is now one of the, if not THE, leading such firm in California. From any language to any language, Allied will keep your word. Nothing will be lost in translation. When words make the difference, Allied is there for you.

A bit about me, Barry Schreiber: I am sometimes known as 'the 2nd most interesting man in the world.' I am currently the California based partner of the Israel law firm, Guy, Bahar & Co.

I am also the Marketing and Networking Director for Allied Interpreting and Translating Services.

I have practiced law for over 48 years, licensed in Florida -1971 and Israel-1997. I served as an elected official I Miami-Dade County, Florida; Commissioner 1976-1990; Judge Pro-Temp, Santa Fe, NM.

I once was a lobbyist, political campaign manager, mediator, work-place mediator, arbitrator, negotiator, motivational speaker, news reporter for The Jewish Press. I’ve been a financier/producer independent films, investor in hi-tech startups, entrepreneur, investment banker-Series 7/79, series 65, 63, life, health, property/casualty license, (0F86645), California, former owner of a full-service Farmers insurance agency.  

Talents: singer, actor: films, theatre, commercials, and industrial, professional cantor, radio talk show host - SAG/AFTRA member since 1985.  Nominated to the Board of Governors-US Postal Service by President Ronald Reagan. I also served on numerous profit and non-profit boards, community organizations, Jewish organizations; 32° Mason/Shriner.

So, where does this blog go from here? I have only written 560 words so far. I need about 1000 more. Let me see. Okay, great. Got it. Let me tell you about the history of interpreting and translating.

Interpreting and Translating: Why and When It Began?

It all began thousands of years ago when the then nations of the world, decided to build a tower in the sky to reach God. Higher and higher the group went. Finally, God, had enough and crushed the tower and spread the builders throughout the world. Up to that time, everyone spoke the same language. When dispersed, there were 70 different languages, and no one could understand the other. Then God decided that one language might not work. So, HE incorporated Allied Interpreting, Inc and anointed Silvia Goldsztajn as CEO/President.

Fact or fiction?  Your call. 

Today there are nearly 6,500 spoken languages in the world. However, about 2,000 of those languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers. The most popular language in the world is Mandarin Chinese.

According to a Babbel article, here are the top 10 languages categorized by the total number of people who speak that language, regardless of their mother tongue.

1. English

1.121 billion total speakers

2. Chinese

1.107 billion total speakers

3. Hindi

534.2 million total speakers

4. Spanish

512.9 million total speakers

5. French

284.9 million total speakers

6. Arabic

273.9 million total speakers

7. Russian

265 million total speakers

8. Bengali

261.8 million total speakers

9. Portuguese

236.5 million total speakers

10. Indonesian

198.4 million total speakers

Interesting, to say the least.

So why did this all happen?  Why did God, get angry with those 70 people who wanted to reach the heavens and touch HIM? Why couldn't we today, have but one language for the billions of people in the world? Would not have one language have been a uniting factor? 

Why do we need languages in the first place?  All of our progress as human beings has been achieved with communication. We need language to express our thoughts and communicate with one another. We use language in spoken form and in written form to communicate.

Some of us have great difficulties in conveying what we mean in our own mother tongue, let alone from one language to another. For example, when speaking English, our body language, intonation, facial expressions, gestures, eye movement tell us more about what is being said than the actual spoken word.

So, picture someone speaking in Spanish, which needs to be interpreted to English by a certified Spanish/English interpreter.  The interpreter will give us the exact word for word meaning, but cannot imitate the intonation, facial expressions, etc.

 (Not that I am counting, but now I have over 1000 words)

Allied’s History Helping the Legal Community

What next? Okay, one of Allied's main focus in the interpretation and translation world is the legal community. Lawyers, Attorneys at Law, Barristers, Solicitors, notaries; lawyers need interpreters for in-take of new clients, depositions, and trials. Lawyers use translators for all written materials that are in a foreign language that require translation to English. And vice versa.

What about a certified interpreter or translator?  When a language is certifiable by the Judicial Counsel in California, then when that language is used, the interpreter/translator must be certified.

Examples of certifiable languages in California are Russian, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Armenian, Farsi. If not certified, then the deposition or translated document will not be admitted as evidence by the Court.

What Else Can I Relate to You in this Blog?

Ah yes, how do lawyers find the interpreters and translators they need? Good question. Let's say a lawyer needs a Russian interpreter. They can search on their own, ask their court reporter to find one, or, simply call Allied.

The latter is by far the most efficient. Lawyers are best served by instructing their secretaries or calendar supervisors to call Allied, knowing that what will show up at their office, for the depo, for trial will be the best available and guaranteed by Allied.

Think about it. The practice of law and being a great Super Lawyer requires great skill in many areas of the discipline.  Why should the lawyer, or law firm have to get stressed out when needing an interpreter or translator in a foreign language? 'Don't stress.  Contact Allied Interpreting.

Just counted my words. A bit over 1200. A few more to go. 

So, here are a few jokes having to do with interpreters and translators.

 

Two translators on a ship are talking.

"Can you swim?" asks one.

"No," says the other, "but I can shout for help in nine languages."

 

Two highway workers were busy working at a construction site when a big car with diplomatic license plates pulled up.

"Parlez-vous français?" the driver asks them. The two workers just stared.

"Sprechen Sie Deutsch?" The two continued to stare at him.

"Fala português?" Neither worker said anything.

"Parlate Italiano?" Still no response.

Finally, the man drives off in disgust.

One worker turned to the other and said, "Gee, maybe we should learn a foreign language…"

"What for? That guy knew four of them and what good did it do him?"


A Spanish speaking bandit held up a bank in Tucson. The sheriff and his deputy chased him. When they captured him, and the sheriff, who 'couldn't speak Spanish, asked him where 'he'd hidden the money. "No sé nada," he replied.

The sheriff put a gun to the 'bandit's head and said to his bi-lingual deputy: "Tell him that if he 'doesn't tell us where the money is right now, 'I'll blow his brains out."

Upon receiving the translation, the bandit became very animated. "¡Ya me acuerdo! Tienen que caminar tres cuadras hasta ese gran arbol: allí está el dinero."

The sheriff leaned forward. "Yeah? Well..?"

The deputy replied: "He says he wants to die like a man."


Wheeew.  Think I made it. But now let's sum up.

This is a blog and contains 1,647 words.

You now know Silvia's and my background. You know about the beginnings of Allied Interpreting. How interpreting and translating started. The myriads of languages today. Understanding each other. Why lawyers need interpreters and translations. How to find Allied and how to have your office call Allied. Stress relief for lawyers.

I shall end with a quote from Josh Billings. “I don't care how much a man talks, if he only says it in a few words.” 

Till the next blog, goodbye, להתראו, bien par, bene da, ~에 좋은, خداحافظ, до свидания, bueno por, Adios, hasta la vista Baby.

For all your interpreting needs, contact Allied Interpreting to see how we can help you communicate in as many words as you need.